The Vigilant Robot

a watchful eye of creative complexity

Tag Archives: death

Flat Lines and Waves

Some poetry writing:

After life there comes death.
Death, like a sweet fruit—
firm with a light crunch, wet, unsubtle taste,
activating.

After death begins life.
Life like a hand abruptly removing the quiet—
forceful and loud, dry, soured awakening.

Digging feet into the ground,
Clawing for the moments before.
Before life,
before death,
before life.

Tightly composed.
Weighing down into the light of darkness.
The light of darkness before life,
before death,
before life.

The light of non conceived masses of being,
of blood that’s blood
and eggs that are eggs,
of truth that doesn’t exist
and breath that is not needed,
of a non-existing existence of nonexistence.

The light of darkness confirms the dark is lightness.
It’s a light of flat-lines in a place of chaos,
of mobility in a space of confinement,
of flame cleansing structure,
and water drowning faith,
of blinding power over-shining within,
of a knowledge over-consumed,
of a whiteness too impure,
of fire consuming all.

We are here.

“Surrealism and War” on Veteran’s Day

The National Veterans Art Museum in Chicago had an exhibition opening a few weeks ago on Veteran’s Day entitled “Surrealism and War,” which features the artwork of nine veterans depicting their experiences of war in somewhat surrealist ways. The exhibition really portrayed the horrors of war for both the innocent people caught in between and those who were drafted or even enlisted to fight. War is senseless, barbaric. War is sad and the poor suffer the most. The U.S. military creates a host of atrocities across the world, and then when the troops come back to their country they are met with no assistance, only the dark thoughts of their experiences, taunting them with bad memories and thoughts of death and suicide. Why?

You can read more about the exhibition here, but I will leave you with some (crappy phone camera) images of artwork that I found most intriguing and moving.

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I got a bit teary staring at this wall. This is the artwork of veteran Jim Leedy.

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Jim Leedy talking about his artwork behind him. He fought in the Korean War and when he returned he had nightmares every day. It was only until he created this large, ominous wall that his nightmares ended. It was his therapy. It begins on the left with images of a few animal bones here and there to depict that killing was done for survival, then moves on to show the horrors and destruction of the manmade invention of war, and then ends with something hopeful, wings, birds taking flight to show that maybe one day war won’t be so rampant, maybe there will be some semblance of peace.

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a section of an Exquisite Corpse

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Exquisite Corpses, each one depicting or symbolizing a specific veteran whether dead or alive

 

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